Location: People >> CS For All Ages >> 50s+ Travellers
Login for full access to Couchsurfing Groups. Not a member yet? Join our community!

Who do you leave it to when you go?
Posted November 14th, 2012 - 7:40 pm from Invercargill, New Zealand
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 14th, 2012 - 9:34 pm from Morgan Hill, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 14th, 2012 - 10:27 pm from Bad Fallingbostel, Germany
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 5:54 am from Walla Walla, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 6:58 am from Victoria, Canada
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 7:00 am from Victoria, Canada
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 3:02 pm from Ottawa, Canada
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 3:28 pm by from Quetzaltenango, Guatemala (Permalink)
Carl, if you would like, I can send you my bank information in a private message. I guarantee that I am just as deserving as any of your relatives, maybe more.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 4:37 pm from Delaware, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 7:02 pm from Victoria, Canada
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 7:07 pm from Walla Walla, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 8:10 pm from Somerville, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 8:10 pm from Invercargill, New Zealand
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 9:41 pm by from Charlotte, United States (Permalink)
In response to not wanting younger heirs to "blow" the money, you can always specify that the heirs will not be given the money until they're, say, 30 years of age.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 4:19 pm by from Trinidad, United States (Permalink)
Or specify that they don't get it until they are fifty! At thirty you can still be impulsive, but less so at fifty.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 7:25 pm by from Papamoa, New Zealand (Permalink)
Re 'What to do with the money left?" In NZ we can form trusts and the executors of that trust have to carry out the wishes of it. Our wishes are that any assetts and monies are kept in trust and beneficiaries, our family members, and extended members, apply to the trust to use it only for education or health.

The trustees decide if their application for funds is warranted. If no one applies it will continue to grow until it is used. Some trusts in Nz have gone on for 3 or 4 generations.

Hopefully we will spend it all before we go- but no guarantees.

Posted November 18th, 2012 - 8:36 pm from Ottawa, Canada
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 4:16 am from Portland, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 20th, 2012 - 6:57 pm from Delaware, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 11:19 pm from Bad Fallingbostel, Germany
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 11:12 pm from Bad Fallingbostel, Germany
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 16th, 2012 - 10:52 pm from Luebeck, Germany
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 15th, 2012 - 9:38 pm by from Charlotte, United States (Permalink)
This is a very interesting question, and one I have had to think about. (I am certainly not wealthy, but unless illness of one kind or another eats up my savings, there will be something left to divvy up.)

I am leaving some money to my brother, sister-in-law, and niece. I'm thinking about adding a few bequests to other people.

The rest I am leaving as a scholarship fund to finance tuition for international women while they are taking Academic ESL courses at the community college where I now teach that subject.

I have an attorney friend who I trust implicitly, and who will administer the scholarship fund.


Posted November 15th, 2012 - 10:02 pm from Tacoma, United States
This member profile has been deactivated

Posted November 16th, 2012 - 4:33 pm from Kuenzelsau, Germany
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 16th, 2012 - 9:49 pm from Thornbury, England
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 16th, 2012 - 10:35 pm from Antwerp, Belgium
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 16th, 2012 - 11:46 pm from Sydney, Australia
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 2:57 am by from Daylesford, Australia (Permalink)
boy, davo, you musta been real fat, a whopper, to be put in the back seat for bmw ballast.....

anyway, bayrische motoren werke produces their cars to cope with many, even bayrische, weather conditions.
add some good winter tires or snow chains, and you'll be yodelling happily while travelling up and down the beautiful alps.

avalanches are, of course, another thing. so, dont yodel too loudly..

yoddellie-yoohooo!
roo :>)


Posted November 17th, 2012 - 3:07 am by from Daylesford, Australia (Permalink)
re leaving my stuff:

so far there are two ants (i and youngest daughter) and two grasshoppers (son and older daughter) in our family. grandchildren to young to tell.

for now, younger daughter will be in charge of everything, should i suddenly keel over. she is generous and reasonable enough to help out the rest of my offspring, if desperate situations should arise. she is also able to hold money together, just as i have been, all my life.

legacy will be fred hollows, enough to save 500 eyes, all round the world.

that should get me into heaven, if there is one.
;>) roo

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 4:44 am from Invercargill, New Zealand
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 8:37 am from Vienna, Austria
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 2:30 pm by from Charlotte, United States (Permalink)
re: ballast in the trunk when driving in icy conditions

Although it has been MANY years since I had to drive on ice (thank goodness!!!!!), I highly recommend bags of KITTY LITTER. It provides weight in the trunk AND can be scattered under the wheels to give traction should the situation require something like that.

Of course, you can eat potatoes but not kitty litter, so if you're stranded under more dire conditions where you can cook on your hot engine block, you may want one bag of potatoes and one of kitty litter.

On the other hand, if you're the trustee for the cat who got the money in the will, you may want to opt for the kitty litter...

Karen

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 2:35 pm from Antwerp, Belgium
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 3:41 pm from Portland, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 3:49 pm from Antwerp, Belgium
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 3:54 pm from Portland, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 3:57 pm from Antwerp, Belgium
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 4:28 pm from Antwerp, Belgium
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 6:55 am by from Tashkent, Uzbekistan (Permalink)
@J Carl,
We all are members of the People >> CS For All Ages >> 50s+ Travellers.
We can choose some warm, safe places on the globe and invest into our small(only for 6-10 travellers)hotel.
I would appreciate very much if it could be named CARAVANSARAY and would be located in the green shirt of Tashkent, where I already bought a land. Now I plan to buy tents for camping,3-4 bicycles and establish a small bungalow building very close (only2-3 kms)to the highway leading to Samarkand,Bukhara,Khiva,the main famous historical places in Uzbekistan.
I have many requests to host CS,but not always I can host them at my home in Tashkent,where the registration of tourists is difficult too.But in the town of my future hotel's location(25 kms from Tashkent)the staying at hotel is cheaper 4 times ,is about $$10-15,the transportation is very convenient too:by metro for $0,25*2=$0.5, and then by minivan for $1*2=$5, also all together it makes $$5-6 to reach my future hotel and then return to Tashkent.
Halima

Posted November 17th, 2012 - 8:28 am by from Tashkent, Uzbekistan (Permalink)
Why have I decided to donate into CARAVANSARAY hotel for CS in Uzbekistan?
We have here in Uzbekistan 2 CS Forums:
Adventures and Travelogues.Adventures on the Great Silk Route.
http://www.couchsurfing.org/group.html?gid=11123
and
Places.Central Asia.Uzbekistan.
http://www.couchsurfing.org/group.html?gid=127
and there was posted a negative reference about a private Uzbek hotel:
Horrible experience in BUKHARA! Please read and share to prevent other travellers.
http://www.couchsurfing.org/group_read.html?gid=127&post=13665092
Halima

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 12:30 pm by from Marseille, France (Permalink)
Bonjour
not easy to write my thoughts in english ,are you a little bit depressed????
I would like to tell you :too young to die you have a lot do live to day and to morrow.
Kind regards
Nicole
your choice will be the best one, if it is your choice.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 12:36 pm by from Mims, United States (Permalink)
Carl,

It has got to be at least a decade since I read it, because I'm not sure when I did. But I did come across my copy of "Die Broke" by Stephen Pollan. If you wish, I'd be happy to let you barrow it.

Best Regards
Greg

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 12:36 pm by from Cincinnati, United States (Permalink)
I usually tell my mother that she should enjoy what she has now--you can't take it with you. We three kids are doing ok and don't need anything other than a few sentimental items to keep in the family.

I suggest that you spend what you have while you can still enjoy it. Any possessions that may be left over, you can assign to those who you believe have some association with them. For instance, I will leave certain gifts to the people who gave them to me. Anything left over, can be donated to charity or auctioned for cash to be distributed to whom you wish--whether that be certain special causes or to specific people in your life.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 12:50 pm by from Sonderborg, Denmark (Permalink)
Hi Carl.
Thats an important question to as. I think it's good for everyone to be aware of! Even if one are as fortunate as I am, to have nice children :0)

I have a really good idea and advice for you:
Search for a group in your area in NZ who is working for the SOS- children's Village Organisation. If you get to know it and maybe wants to do some voluntary work as well, I'm sure you will find it easy to donate your possessions to the organisation. It works worldwide and is a very reliable organisation, which not uses lots of money on administration!

I have supported them myself for many years, and when I retired I started working voluntarily with a kind of fundraising. Just try to google SOS children village NZ. I'm sure it will show up.

Kind regards to you and your lovely country that I visited for 7 weeks back in 2000.

Birte from Denmark.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 1:28 pm by from Weston-super-Mare, England (Permalink)
Carl

Losing my brother and sister within a short period of time caused me to think about my mortality. I only have one son who is now 46 and is reasonably established. I have helped him out now and again but he has said that he doesn't expect anything and encourages me to spend what little I've got on travel. So I am!!

I have made a will and paid for my funeral - I know if there is anything left that my son would spend it on stuff that I wouldn't think was necessary - but that will be his choice - he won't get it again!

My nephews and nieces have at some stage or other mentioned bits and pieces that they like and this has been added to a codicil to my will. I won't have anything left for charitable organisations but I am doing my bit now by volunteering.

I don't think it is morbid or gloomy to think of these things - it was quite fund trying to think of music etc to be played at my funeral - do I choose "Smoke gets in your eyes" as my coffin is taken out to the crematorium?

Anne

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 2:19 pm by from Besancon, France (Permalink)
Hello from France,

It's really interesting to read you about this subject and I agree Anne when she said that the first thing is to pay our own funeral when we are still alive.
It's not morbid it's just a private question about my body and my choice before to be falled in Alzheimer.

Suzanne

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 2:23 pm by from Lyons, United States (Permalink)
Carl,

I'm guessing you love travel and the potential life-changing experiences it can offer. I had a friend who left an equal amount of his estate to his grandchildren (in your case it could be nieces and nephews) to use for a travel experience of their/your choice. You could set up a minimum age before it could be used--early age to encourage exploration, or later age to hopefully tap into thoughtful planning, for instance. It could be stipulated it had to be international travel, if you find that to be of value. The list could go on, depending upon your desires and what kind of gift you want to make, what kind of experience you want to create.

This approach avoids the concern of some frittering away their inheritance. Of course some may appreciate it and get more out of the experience than others, and some may choose to go to a casino and gamble away Uncle Carl's $. (In an attempt to avoid some of this, you could set up parameters of what kind of experience is intended and have your Trustee/Executor monitor this.) And, you can't really control everything from the grave, but the point here is to give to all a taste of one of the things Uncle Carl valued. It could be a life changing experience that will always be remembered coming from you and that would be a secondary gift of immeasurable proportions. Who knows the ripple effect it could cause; where and how it could lead to world peace.

I'd be interested in what you think about this...or not. Whatever you choose, my friend!

Best,
Don

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 3:11 pm from Mumbai, India
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 3:02 pm by from San Antonio, United States (Permalink)
Since you won't be around, how can their feelings matter to you post mortem? I have no intention to distrube my estate equally.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 4:27 pm from Delaware, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 3:37 pm by from Panajachel, Guatemala (Permalink)
live fully and hope you spend your last dollar on your last day. For anything extra a little evenly spread to those relatives and kids to help them make some mistakes as a learning experience. The rest towards what you never got around to supporting in your life. And don't worry.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 3:56 pm by from Fort Collins, United States (Permalink)
As others have already suggested, best to leave it to charities.

Naeem

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 4:20 pm from Victoria, Canada
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 4:29 pm by from Curitiba, Brazil (Permalink)
J Carl, thanks to this thread I´ve been thinking about this issue - though not about my will yet. Firstly, have to convince my parents to make theirs...

As Catface wrote, their children never brought up the subject because of a similar squeamishness/ delicacy/ superstition/ whatever. Now they are all left with a real mess to sort out.

Time to face and resolve it!

Hugs,

Emi.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 6:53 pm by from Redlands, United States (Permalink)
My husband and I went to an attorney some years ago and had a Living Trust prepared. It was expensive--$2,000--but it eliminates estate taxes for our only daughter. House, car, belongings are all in the trust to be sold and distributed. She are her husband are fiscally responsible, so we are giving 50% to specific charities and 50% to her. We have always had basic jobs, not professions, but we are very frugal and save like crazy.

Then my husband almost died two years ago. He has since recovered, and we've decided to give money while we are alive. We enjoy it very much, and I especially need the practice of giving, since my basic instinct is to hold onto things. We've always given to charities and now added providing one year of university to each of our two grandchildren---but we choose the school for that year. It sounds controlling, but it's our money, and we want to be sure they are get a good education for at least that year. It is a huge incentive for them to go, and it is a gift to our daughter, because she doesn't have to pay that year.

This is a sacrifice, because we don't have a large retirement savings. I hope we are not causing our daughter a fiscal problem when we are more elderly than we are now. But money is for spending, not hoarding, so we can always sell our house to pay for any special care we may need.

We also believe and practice the Bible verse that says, "Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things (clothing such as the dressing of the lilies of the field and food such as the feeding of the birds mentioned earlier) will be added to you."

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 7:39 pm from Philadelphia, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 7:45 pm from Victoria, Canada
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 8:11 pm by from Wohlen bei Bern, Switzerland (Permalink)
Carl
Spend your money as long as you can. Buy good food and good wine, take a trip you always wanted to take but never did because it was too expensive.
You can give some money to people who do good things with. (My cousin was a doctor in Simbabwe; I gave him 10'000 $ for an orphanage.)
Enjoy your money, enjoy your life!
Walter

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 8:22 pm by from Daylesford, Australia (Permalink)
i really dislike the notion that people are responsible to pay for their own funerals:

in the last few years, here in australia at least, insurance companies have pushed this idea at nauseam with the most revolting, guilt-inducing tv commercials.

first, lists of costs appears on the screen, suggesting that $10.000 or some other ridiculous amount must be spent, in advance, to get a loved one underground.

next, 'relatives' appear, tearful, not crying for the dead, but weeping about the cost of funerals.

finally, righteous oldies, smugly smiling and announcing that they are dong the right thing, not burdening their families with funeral costs. indicating, of course, that people who don't follow suit, are doing the wrong thing by their families.

what crap.

making people feel bad about the cost of dying? most people leave something, at least. it is moral duty of the heirs to bury them, out of the inheritance.
(anyway,i have a reverse reaction to hated commercials, i decide, specifically, not to buy the produce.)

for heaven's sake - there is nothing as certain as death, in our lives. why should it come as a surprise when a person dies, especially when they are old?
everyone is heading for death, from the moment of conception.
(i wondered earlier, somewhere here on cs, whether some crazy yank has already decided to sue his parents for condemning him to death by deciding to create his person. with apologies to all the reasonable yanks.)

my daughter will have everything i leave behind, including house&contents, land, car, bank account and investments.
she can bloody well pay for my funeral, out of that.
respect.
she knows i want the simplest cremation and my ashes are to feed a fruit tree in her garden. i'll have a park bench, with an invitation to sit in peace, by my favourite lake, set up rather than a useless tombstone.
and then a lovely wake, with local musicians fiddling away, good cheer about a long, interesting life, and plenty to eat and drink, for all and sundry.

but not for a while yet

:>) lively roo
feeling much better after this lengthy rant...


Posted November 19th, 2012 - 9:12 pm from Ottawa, Canada
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 20th, 2012 - 6:07 am by from Daylesford, Australia (Permalink)
it is not a money matter, george.

and no, science can't have my body. had i died younger, with parts of me still useful for transplanting, i would have agreed, to save someones life.

but i don't like the idea of med students cutting me up.
unfortunately quite a few students are far from respectful and careful with the corpses they have to practice.
i heard some dreadful tales of tasteless jokes and other things i don't even want to mention here. authentic source, i believe. not for me.

a much older friend here has enquired at the local undertaker and a simple, modest cremation with no frills is about $3000. fair enough.

might go up a bit though, depending on how many decades this old roo manages to hop around.

:>)

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 4:26 pm by from Berkeley, United States (Permalink)
Leave it to your favorite charity or environmental organization.

Posted November 19th, 2012 - 5:26 pm from Hartford, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 20th, 2012 - 9:51 am by from Vadodara, India (Permalink)
For me the best use of our funds while spending our last inning is to extend our help, in whatever way it is possible for us, for the upliftment of meritoriously brilliant unreachable, untouchables and poorest of the poor children by providing good education to them. This way, it may be possible that we can be a medium in providing potentially brilliant adult citizens with strong characters and leadership skills to the Society, Nation and World at large. With this intention, I have formed a charity based NGO, of which details can be checked by visiting at www.childrenwelfarefoundationtrust.org. If it appeals you, you can take up some similar projects at your place or you can be a valuable partner in implementing their mission also.
With warmest regards,
Rameshwar Rathi

Posted November 20th, 2012 - 11:08 am by from Asmara, Eritrea (Permalink)
My sweet parents passed away eleven years ago. I have nine siblings, yes you read it correctly, there are ten of us. They were very wise. They left the ten of us their money. Each of us received 10 % of their money, so it was all equal. Second their possessions were ditributed equally. We put our names in the hat and we were numbered 1 - 10. The first person got to choose an item first and had to choose last in the second round. The person who scored tenth was also able to pick eleventh in the second round. Kind of like a hockey draft. What a miracle! Eleven years have passed and not on of us feeling deprived or grudges against others.

Thanks to my folks, I used the money to enroll into teacher's college in New Zealand and have enjoyed teaching ever since.

Myself, I am a single middle aged bachelor. I don't have much to give, but I may have to consider this soon.

Posted November 20th, 2012 - 4:27 pm from Camden, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 20th, 2012 - 8:42 pm from Antwerp, Belgium
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 20th, 2012 - 11:01 pm from Invercargill, New Zealand
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 20th, 2012 - 7:15 pm from Walla Walla, United States
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 26th, 2012 - 10:52 am from Boyanup, Australia
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 26th, 2012 - 3:10 pm from Sydney, Australia
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Post removed.
Posted November 26th, 2012 - 5:10 pm by from Saint Petersburg, United States (Permalink)
This post has been removed by the user.

Deleted Post
Posted November 26th, 2012 - 5:33 pm by from Anchorage, United States (Permalink)
I was interested in all the suggestions for "who do you leave it to?" I have considered this in detail, because I have NO relatives. I live with a life-partner, but if I outlive him (which is likely, given the statistics), I have to decide to whom I will bequeath my bits and pieces. I won't have much, primarily a vintage clothing and jewelry collection, but I don't want to think of it all thrown out or donated to The Salvation Army. If I did have blood relatives, or even relatives of my partner's of whom I was more fond, I would find it much easier to write a will. All I have are a few good friends and they, sadly, are close to my own age and are hardly good candidates for receiving legacies.

This issue caused me to examine why I was spending so much time obsessively deciding on just the right beneficiaries for my vintage jewelry, or for my vintage Art Deco vanity. Why did I care if the recipient will care as much as I do about the item? I don't believe I will have a consciousness after death. I won't know what happens. I think my concern has to do with my drive to be remembered in some way after I die, in the legacy of the accumulation of my life, in the drive writers and artists (I am both) have to be seen, read, preserved in future generations. I have had no children. My works are my children; my house, my possessions, symbolize the way I've lived my life. my style and values.

How do I pass on my knowledge without children who will inherit? I settled instead on those ideas about which I care: the environment; the arts; education. I don't have enough in my "estate" to endow a scholarship, but I would do that if I could. I settled on giving those monies left-over (after some personal bequests) to The Nature Conservancy, to a local theatre group, and to National Public Radio (the educational element I could afford). I am sure you have equivalent organizations, or others you like, in New Zealand.

It is a powerful urge, to linger on after we are no longer physically here. I have a fantasy that a few years after I die, an actor in a period play might remember her elegant costume or 1940s hat once was mine, and she'd wonder about my story, as I wonder when I wear it now about the woman who bought it new 60 years ago, who she was, what were her loves and dislikes, and what were her dreams for her own life. I have tried to wear and treat my vintage collection as my contribution to the chapters of those stories, as if I carry on their secret, whispered legacies.

Most important: enjoy the process of sorting out your bequests! I wish I had the talent to be as humorous as some in writing about this.

Jocelyn

Posted November 26th, 2012 - 9:15 pm from Ottawa, Canada
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted November 26th, 2012 - 9:28 pm by from Quepos, Costa Rica (Permalink)
Bless your heart, George. YES the Gift society is about the JOY of giving, without expectation of gain. Too many people "gift to get". The other day, a dear friend of mine saw two young mothers, here in Costa Rica, with about 10 kids in tow. So my friend paid the bus fare for the entire group. Because it was Sunday, and she could!!! The following week, the "fisherman" father came by and gifted my friend some fresh Red Snapper.... pay it forward, and enJOY the ride.

paz y amor, Elena

Posted November 26th, 2012 - 9:33 pm by from Quepos, Costa Rica (Permalink)
My dear one, If you have vintage clothes, PLEASE see if there are any classic or antique car clubs in your area. All the women are always looking for clothes to match the age of the cars. An many of the men, try to wear clothes of the era!!!

Posted November 26th, 2012 - 8:33 pm by from Quepos, Costa Rica (Permalink)
Bless your heart, CARL!! Great question.

Would you like to help me form "LIVE FREE till you die" TRUST? I am serious. I received a clear message about this just last night. If you know anything about Astrology, I have 5 planets in Libra in the 10th house. The 10th would be the outward expression of profession, occupation, promotion, and affairs of state or community. Libra generally is balance.

Finca Amanecer IS an Eco-commUNITY, with a longevity education center format. Laughing Gecko Campgrounds is where the young (Couch Surfing, WWOOF and Warm Showers) volunteers can learn about living a "Sustainable" lifestyle, and lots of personal growth opportunities, too.

When pulling it all together, the chart said: I'd be helping people pass from this plane to the next and they would be "dying to give me money", (through will bequeaths and legacy). When I read it I couldn't understand how I could develop the project and "Don't worry about the money, it will come".

Thus the real question is how can I provide benefits for them NOW? Most communities or "developments" charge an upfront fee for the housing unit, and then "members" receive discounts on the meals and services. By making the TRUST the beneficiary on an existing life insurance policy or other assets, the "member" can "Live now and pay for the housing later". If some members can afford to buy more share now, then they can resell them to future members.

IOF has been doing it for centuries: http://www.foresters.com/US-EN/About/Pages/about-foresters.aspx So it can be done.

It's going back to the traditions of taking care of each other.... and Living FREE-- (especially of debt). I don't know if I need to affiliate my project in Costa Rica, or begin out own trust..... vamos a ver. but there are places where you can make a difference. If you'd like to know more about my chart, just send me a private msg.

IF anyone wants to help out an Animal Refuge Sanctuary here in Costa Rica, msg. me and I'll send you the details on that one too. and THANK YOU, all for addressing the subject. Cause when a person dies intestate, it creates a big mess, for everyone.

paz y amor, Elena