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Any One From New Orleans?
Posted December 19th, 2012 - 12:41 pm by from Bangor, United States (Permalink)
Will be in New Orleans with my 20 y.o. daughter new years week. Since she is below drinking age, we are looking for something fun and special to do new years eve other than drink. Any and all ideas would be most appreciated.

Thanks! - Susan

PS - I did post this to the New Orleans group last week, but no replies. My post was lost amidst popular posts about where the wild young parties are new years eve. Felt like an old fart ;)

Posted December 19th, 2012 - 1:50 pm from Tanum, Sweden
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Posted December 19th, 2012 - 6:04 pm from Sydney, Australia
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Posted December 19th, 2012 - 9:12 pm from Tanum, Sweden
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Posted December 19th, 2012 - 10:24 pm by from Bangor, United States (Permalink)
These responses are much better than an answer to my question. Can't stop laughing. Here's some advice from this old fart...

Five years ago I adopted a dog with a gas problem. Ever since, we (the humans in the house) blame our putrid fumes on the dog whether he is guilty or not. In exchange for being our scapegoat (scapedog?), we feed him and shower him with love.

If I can't find something fun to do in NOLA on new year's eve, I think I will check in with this 50+ group for all the fun and laughs I need. Or, perhaps, all the fun and laughs an old fart can handle.

Susan

Posted December 26th, 2012 - 5:36 pm by from Los Angeles, United States (Permalink)
A day or two before New Year's Eve, you can go to the French Quarter, walk toward the river to Decatur Street, and turn left. At the end of Decatur street, across the quaint Esplanade Avenue with a lawn down the middle, there's a little bar on the corner where you can do laundry in the back room. If you don't say too much, you can blend in with the natives and see how it feels to live there. That's where a local told me that if you ever get stopped by the police in New Orleans, you can ask them what they want, and they'll usually set a reasonable price to settle things informally. Well, he actually said they always will. There are a few books in that little room, in case the locals are all too hung over to find their way back there.

Then, that night, you can go on down Decatur Street a few steps to where it curves to the left to become Frenchman Street. In a couple of blocks you will come to the Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro on your left. Don't go in there. It makes you look like a tourist to go in there. Go across the street to a little dive with seating for fifteen or twenty people, including the couch and the bar stools. If it's too crowded, you can stand at the door and still see and hear what's going on. They change bands every hour. Most of the musicians are playing for each other as much as for the audience. I'd recommend being sober, if you want to get the most out of it.

Then, some day when the library is open you could go to the top floor and read the editorials on the front page of the Picayune newspaper from December, 1859. They're on microfiche, which should have survived Katrina, that high above the ground. They don't send those microfiche out through interlibrary loan. You have to go there.

In 1859, news came from California was pretty fresh. It came by pony express to Denver, and then on to New Orleans by telegraph.

The editor of the Picayune kept a cool head. He said, even with Lincoln being elected president, if they stayed in the union things wouldn't get too bad. The yankees wouldn't be able to raise tariffs to protect Northern manufacturers, for example. That had been tried before, and the Southern States had blocked it. He thought that recent unpleasantness at Harper's Ferry, Virginia was a fluke and had little support in the North.

The editor of the most popular competing newspaper was a hothead. He said Lincoln was the leader of the "Black Republican Party," for example, and he reported gleefully on secessionist sentiments in various Southern states.

You can check the prices of human beings in those papers. They were rather high, considering the fact that long term ownership was uncertain. You may be sober for a long time after reading those advertisements.

On New Year's Eve, that little joint on Frenchman's Street will probably be too crowded to get into unless you make arrangements in advance. Maybe one of the musicians will let you help carry his instruments. If you're sober, he really should. Can you carry a tune? Have you got a nice outfit?

The locals may not be aware of any restrictions on the drinking age, but I'd recommend sobriety. There's no use being so mentally impaired that you miss a perfectly good trip to New Orleans.

Sometimes I know what it means to miss New Orleans.

Posted December 26th, 2012 - 6:21 pm from Walla Walla, United States
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