Location: Places >> Oceania >> Australia
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How do you get along with all these poisonous animals?
Posted January 25th, 2013 - 3:37 pm by from Kiel, Germany (Permalink)
Hello dear Australians,

yesterday I saw a tv documentary about poisonous animals, and was reminded that there are various kinds of poisonous snakes and spiders living in Australia, I think that there are lots of other dangerous animals as well, f.e. sharks and so on... I wonder how you can live like that in Australia when you always have to expect a spider to sit in your shoe and bite you or something like that... are there a lot of poeple who die from this in your country?

Thanks for answering, Magdalena

Posted January 25th, 2013 - 11:48 pm by from Melbourne, Australia (Permalink)
I lived there for a year and only once did I come into the proximity of a Red back Spider... And even that was a fluke.

It is very rare that you come in contact with any of these animals on these shows... cause in the end, the shows get ratings by over stating the dangers and scare-mongering.

If your smart, the chances of you coming across a Western Brown Snake, Funnel Web, or even Box jellyfish...

Posted January 25th, 2013 - 11:49 pm by from Melbourne, Australia (Permalink)
might I add, in my year I did alot of outdoors activities, and camping.

Posted January 26th, 2013 - 12:28 am by from Gladstone, Australia (Permalink)
Hey
I am a born and raised Aussie and I've never seen a dangerous snake in the wild (just tree snakes and carpet snakes) lots of spiders but only been bitten by a red back when I was about 6. Most painful thing I've ever experienced, I can still remember it. But now I don't even have a scar from it, you would never know!

And shark attacks are rare as we know not to swim in canals as they have bull sharks (bad temper and will attack just for the hell of it).

Crocodiles are cranky animals too and will attack anyone or anything that is in their homes. I live in Gladstone (7 hours north from Brisbane) and it has crocodiles that go to the beach for a swim but crocodiles are nonexistent in bigger towns and I am yet to see a live one out of a zoo.

I think it is just something you grow up with, yes I check my runners for spiders before I put them on probably more out of habit then fear as its just how life is here and it's such a beautiful amazing country I hope the more dangerous wildlife doesn't put you off as I can assure you the chances of you meeting a dangerous snake/spider are slim since in 19 years I've had one in counter :)

Posted January 28th, 2013 - 1:47 pm from Newcastle, Australia
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Posted January 29th, 2013 - 11:10 am by from Sydney, Australia (Permalink)
I echo Bren's words on the Drop Bear. A grossly underestimated threat and rarely seen (therefore rarely filmed) creature. Usually harmless if a good supply of Bundy Rum is around. Harder to get footage of than the platypus, which is dangerous enough in itself. Read about it here - and note it is second after the Hippo - itself responsible for more African tourist deaths than all of the wild cats combined

http://www.cracked.com/article_15853_the-6-cutest-animals-that-can-still-destroy-you.html

You see - the truth of the matter is that the deadly animals in Australia only target tourists. Think about it - how often does a Barcelona native get pickpocketed? How often does a Thai man get propositioned by deadly, disease carrying hookers in Bangkok? We live here and they know we are not easy targets so they avoid us, because they know if we get attacked, the police get called and your nasty spider/snake/croc is hauled off to spend the night in the slammer. Tourists are deathly afraid of them and animals can sense that fear.

Best thing to do is start working on your accent.

All jokes aside, animal attacks are super-rare in Australia and you are probably more likely to crash your car freaking out at a Huntsman spider sunning across your windscreen en route to the beach than getting bitten by a spider in a lifetime living in Oz (or getting bitten by a shark once you get to the beach, for that matter).

By the way - realistically, stay out of canals. Bull sharks are no joke, they do mess people up for fun. There was one cruising around many years ago when I dived the Yongala shipwreck and I was so nervous the whole time we were underwater. Crocs are a relic of the Jurassic era and have only survived by being so good at not being seen - so don't think you'll see them - if there's a warning sign at a waterhole, don't try your luck and stay at least a few metres from the water's edge. Finally, if you do come down here - and you come across a cassowary in the wild - do not treat it like a child seeing Big Bird on the set of Sesame Street, they are unbelievably fast runners, very aggressive when threatened and it will gut you with its feet pretty quickly.

Hope you have a good trip!


Posted January 30th, 2013 - 1:12 am from Melbourne, Australia
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Posted January 30th, 2013 - 2:31 pm from Auckland, New Zealand
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Posted February 1st, 2013 - 2:37 am from Newcastle, Australia
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Posted February 7th, 2013 - 12:48 am by from Milano, Italy (Permalink)
dont come to australia is the answer