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Do vegans eat honey from bees?
Posted August 25th, 2010 - 10:00 pm by from Quetzaltenango, Guatemala (Permalink)
Hello everyone. Thanks for welcoming me into your group. I joined because I own a small restaurant in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala that has a vegan section on the menu. A very popular item with our guests is fruit crepes with honey and various spices. We use honey because most people prefer that to cane sugar or corn syrup. My question is whether it is appropriate to put the fruit crepes in the vegan section. I honestly don't know whether most vegans eat honey and I do not want to serve anyone something that they do not want to eat. Thanks for your responses.

Posted August 25th, 2010 - 10:08 pm by from Boulder, United States (Permalink)
Philip,

In my experience some vegans eat honey and others do not. Do you use the honey as a sweetener in the batter or a topping? If it's a topping, it's easy to leave off if people do not want it.

In my experience crepes are made with eggs, milk, and butter, which would make them not vegan. I would love to find a vegan crepe!

Posted August 25th, 2010 - 10:14 pm by from Utrecht, Netherlands (Permalink)
Hi Philip,
Wow, great that you offer vegan food in your restaurant!
I don't know what percentage of vegans do and don't eat honey, but many don't, so I wouldn't offer the crepes with honey. You're probably safest if you use brown sugar: sugar is sometimes whitened using bone char, and therefore some vegans also prefer not to eat it.
good luck!
Charlotte

Posted August 25th, 2010 - 10:16 pm by from Utrecht, Netherlands (Permalink)
Mariah, I really like these: http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=24863.0 - I just use vegetable oil rather than Earth Balance.

Posted August 25th, 2010 - 10:29 pm by from Quetzaltenango, Guatemala (Permalink)
Wow, this worked really well. I got three responses almost instantly. The honey is put directly on top of the fruit, then we put on cinnamon and a few other spices. Good point about the crepe itself having milk and eggs. I honestly hadn't thought about that as my girlfriend does most of the cooking. I don't know if we can makes crepes without milk or eggs, in which case we obviously have to move it out of the vegan section. I will check with the cook. Please stop by the cafe if you are ever in Guatemala.

Posted August 25th, 2010 - 10:35 pm by from Utrecht, Netherlands (Permalink)
:D I assumed you were making vegan crepes since you'd gone so far as to think about the honey :D
There are plenty of recipes for delicious vegan crepes and pancakes out there, just experiment a bit :)

Posted August 25th, 2010 - 10:47 pm by from Har'el, Israel (Permalink)
Us veggies are on top of it:

Though I'm not a vegan myself, I have a lot of friends and family (and those who feel like family), who are. So I do a lot of cooking for them, when I cook ;+}

I have made vegan brownies using a paste made of flour and water instead of eggs, and muffins using applesauce instead of eggs (apples have starch, as do potatoes, sweet or otherwise).

I would Love to come to Guatemala...maybe someday!

Here is one of a zillion recipes for vegan pancakes that I've cut and now pasted:

Yes, it's true, you can make perfectly good pancakes without eggs or even milk! This vegan pancake recipe uses soy milk as a substitute and the result is perfect light and fluffy pancakes. You might also want to try this recipe for vegan blueberry pancakes or a sweet vegan pancake recipe with strawberries. If you're in the mood to try something different, here's a great recipe for vegan apple pecan pancakes. Enjoy!

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:
•1 cup flour
•1 tbsp sugar
•2 tbsp baking powder
•1/8 tsp salt
•1 cup soy milk
•2 tbsp vegetable oil

Preparation:
Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large bowl until well mixed.
Mix in the soy milk and oil and beat together until batter is smooth.

Drop 1/4 cup of batter at a time onto a hot oiled griddle, or well greased frying pan over medium high heat. When bubbles appear on the surface of the pancake, approximately 3 minutes, flip, and cook the other side for another 2 minutes. Enjoy!

Nutrition Facts: One pancake provides approximately: Calories: 149, Calories from Fat: 50
Total Fat: 5.6g, 9% Saturated Fat: 1.0g, 5%
Cholesterol: 0mg, 0%
Sodium: 58mg, 2%
Total Carbohydrates: 22.2g, 7%
Dietary Fiber: 1.2g, 5%
Sugars: 2.4g
Protein: 3.7g
Vitamin A 0%, Vitamin C 0%, Calcium 22%, Iron 9%, based on a 2000 calorie diet






Posted August 26th, 2010 - 3:03 am by from Sutton, Canada (Permalink)
honey is definetly not vegan.
Veganism is a philosophy and lifestyle whose adherents seek to exclude the use of animals for food, clothing, or any other purpose. Vegans do not to use or consume animal products of any kind. Notable animal products include meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy products, honey, fur, leather, wool, and silk. Common animal products also include gelatin, lanolin, rennet, whey, casein, beeswax, isinglass, carmine, and shellac. Animal products such as ground bone and powdered fish organs may be used in the production of a product although they may not appear as an ingredient in the final product.


I suggest to everybody the book Vegan with a Vengeance for basic recipe like pancakes, cookies, muffins, etc. Lots of tips on vegan cooking and baking. I use the pancake recipe in this book for crêpe by putting more soymilk or water and making it more thin
and visit http://theppk.com/ (wich as been a reference for me through the last few years)

My favorite way to substitute egg in baking recipe is flax-egg (Finely grind 1 tablespoon whole flaxseeds in a blender or coffee grinder, or use 2 1/2 tablespoons pre-ground flaxseeds. Transfer to a bowl and beat in 3 tablespoons of water using a whisk or fork. It will become very gooey and gelatinous, much like an egg white)

I made a lot of research and a lot of experiment about vegan kitchen. So if you want more info, I'll be really glad to help if I can!

Posted August 26th, 2010 - 3:05 am by from Sutton, Canada (Permalink)
oh! and agave nectar is a wonderful vegan honey!

Posted August 26th, 2010 - 4:30 am by from Marseille, France (Permalink)
Hi Philip,

Last year, I read other threads on the same subject.
Like you, a guy asked the same question in several groups which gave very interesting discussions:
http://www.couchsurfing.org/group_read.html?gid=516&post=3490985
http://www.couchsurfing.org/group_read.html?gid=2040&post=3491020
http://www.couchsurfing.org/group_read.html?gid=2095&post=3490979

Posted August 26th, 2010 - 7:17 am by from Berlin, Germany (Permalink)
Hey there, luckily for us there's lots of egg/milk replacements available... for baking or preparing a dish that calls for eggs there is also Ener-G Egg Replacer is a reliable egg substitute for use in baking. It is available at health food stores and most grocery stores.

Tofu is great for egg substitutions in recipes that call for a lot of eggs, like quiches or custards. To replace one egg in a recipe, purée 1/4 cup soft tofu. It is important to keep in mind that although tofu doesn’t fluff up like eggs, it does create a texture that is perfect for “eggy” dishes. May I recommend scrambled tofu for your menu, it's incredibly yummy here's a great recipe: http://www.theppk.com/recipes/dbrecipes/index.php?RecipeID=110
I usually make it much more simply though with just crumbled tofu in a skillet with soup stock for seasoning...yumm! I'm making myself hungry here...

In Desserts and Sweet, Baked Goods try substituting one banana or 1/4 cup applesauce for each egg called for in a recipe for sweet, baked desserts. These will add some flavor to the recipe, so make sure bananas or apples are compatible with the other flavors in the dessert.
Other Egg Replacement Options

• 1 egg = 2 Tbsp. potato starch
• 1 egg = 1/4 cup mashed potatoes
• 1 egg = 1/4 cup canned pumpkin or squash
• 1 egg = 1/4 cup puréed prunes
• 1 egg = 1 Tbsp. soy flour mixed with 2 Tbsp. water
• 1 egg = 2 Tbsp. water + 1 Tbsp. oil + 2 tsp. baking powder
• 1 egg = 1 Tbsp. ground flax seed simmered in 3 Tbsp. water
• 1 egg white = 1 Tbsp. plain agar powder dissolved in 1 Tbsp. water, whipped, chilled, and whipped again

Egg Replacement Tips

• If a recipe calls for three or more eggs, it is important to choose a replacer that will perform the same function (i.e., binding or leavening).
• Trying to replicate airy baked goods that call for a lot of eggs, such as angel food cake, can be very difficult. Instead, look for a recipe with a similar taste but fewer eggs, which will be easier to replicate.
• When adding tofu to a recipe as an egg replacer, be sure to purée it first to avoid chunks in the finished product.
• Be sure to use plain tofu, not seasoned or baked, as a replacer.
• Powdered egg replacers cannot be used to create egg recipes such as scrambles or omelets. Tofu is the perfect substitute for eggs in these applications.
• If you want a lighter texture and you’re using fruit purées as an egg substitute, add an extra 1/2 tsp. baking powder. Fruit purées tend to make the final product denser than the original recipe.
• If you’re looking for an egg replacer that binds, try adding 2 to 3 Tbsp. of any of the following for each egg: tomato paste, potato starch, arrowroot powder, whole wheat flour, mashed potatoes, mashed sweet potatoes, instant potato flakes, or 1/4 cup tofu puréed with 1 Tbsp. flour.

Hopes this helps!

Posted August 27th, 2010 - 1:29 am by from Quetzaltenango, Guatemala (Permalink)
Thanks to everyone for your replies. You have been very helpful. I am happy I joined this group.

Posted September 10th, 2010 - 4:39 pm by from Heidelberg, Germany (Permalink)
I really liked this post !!! And I thanks Robekkah Ritchie for the information she posted, I really needed it !!!!! I copy-pasted what u posted in our veggy group of Montevideo, Uruguay , and off course posted your name there !!!!

Feel free to go and visit us !!!!

Thanks for sharing !!!!!!!!!!!!

Nats


Posted August 30th, 2010 - 4:42 am by from Montreal, Canada (Permalink)
Some vegans eat honey, some don't, but I think that technically honey isn't vegan. I'm vegan and eat raw honey sometimes that come from bees that are well taken care of.

I'm surprised that no one has suggested maple syrup since it's such a good combo with crepes, but I guess it might be hard to find maple syrup in Guatamala. I'm also surprised that no one has mentioned how ground flax seeds mixed in some water makes a great substitute for eggs. I make buckwheat crepes including soaked buckwheat groats, ground flax seeds, baking powder, sea salt and some maple syrup. I blend the mixture in a blender and voila! I've also made some with rice and oat flour, which are all great because they're gluten-free as well! If you want to learn the recipes and see a pictures of them, hop over to my food blog UnReFiNeD: http://www.nocrapdiet.wordpress.com

Posted August 30th, 2010 - 4:43 am by from Montreal, Canada (Permalink)
Some vegans eat honey, some don't, but I think that technically honey isn't vegan. I'm vegan and eat raw honey sometimes that come from bees that are well taken care of.

I'm surprised that no one has suggested maple syrup since it's such a good combo with crepes, but I guess it might be hard to find maple syrup in Guatamala. I'm also surprised that no one has mentioned how ground flax seeds mixed in some water makes a great substitute for eggs. I make buckwheat crepes including soaked buckwheat groats, ground flax seeds, baking powder, sea salt and some maple syrup. I blend the mixture in a blender and voila! I've also made some with rice and oat flour, which are all great because they're gluten-free as well! (P.S. While oats can contain gluten (I'm not entirely sure what the issue is), it is possible to buy gluten-free oats) If you want to learn the recipes and see a pictures of them, hop over to my food blog UnReFiNeD: http://www.nocrapdiet.wordpress.com

Posted September 4th, 2010 - 8:52 pm by from Chiang Mai, Thailand (Permalink)
I am vegan and i EAT honey.

Honey is made by bees but it is not a product that comes FROM their bodies, as milk comes from a cow. Bees carry it, inside their bodies, and then basically throw it up again.
So maybe I'm eating some bee spit but that's about it.

Either way, it is up for each Vegan to choose himself.

On a side note, bee pollen is not carried inside the bee.(it sticks to their hind legs)

Bees milk(golden honey) is the most UN-Vegan since it is produced by the workers for their queen. (I do eat it if i have the chance though)

Last; the bees that we have and eat honey from have been raised by humans for so long that they naturally over produce. Meaning, if we don't eat it it will go to waste, unless there's a lot of bears around.

Posted April 16th, 2012 - 7:38 am by from Utrecht, Netherlands (Permalink)
Still, keeping bees isn't vegan (since keeping animals isn't vegan).

Leather is also not exactly from within the animals, just the skin right? Would you wear that too?

I think it's disgusting to eat anyone's puke, also bee's puke. Honey isn't vegan per definition, because it is an animal product. Just like fish is not vegetarian, and the fact that many people seem to misunderstand that, doesn't maken it vegetarian.

If you do eat honey you are not vegan, just as you are not vegan if you eat eggs. You'd be a strict vegetarian.