Location: Ideas >> Vegans & Vegetarians >> vegan/vegetarian
Login for full access to Couchsurfing Groups. Not a member yet? Join our community!

Eggs - what's the maximum we shall eat per week? :)
Posted May 8th, 2011 - 8:33 pm by from Albufeira, Portugal (Permalink)
Hey brothers! Hey sisters!

How are you guys doing?

I've become Vegan a couple of months ago.

And although I no longer eat any dairy, I have the chance to eat "biological eggs", as my parents raise a few dozens of very happy chickens (that have the chance to live free in their countryside house and eat healthy).

Was just wondering what's the maximum amount of eggs a Vegan person shall eat per week.

Does the fact that we don't eat meat / fish / dairy (and thus any animal fat but the egg yolk), give us the chance to eat more then the recommendable 3 or 4 eggs per week a meat eater should eat?


Hope you guys are doing excellent and to hear from some of you soon!
:)

Machado

Posted May 8th, 2011 - 9:13 pm by from Linden, Germany (Permalink)
Hi Machado, como estas?

I don't mean to criticise you, just wanted to say: eggs (or anything else from animals) are NEVER vegan, under no circumstance. even if the eggs fell out of a magical rubbish bin in the sky ;P

There are three reasons I would give why we should never eat eggs (but stick to veganism), no matter where they come from.

1) In any kind of egg production, only FEMALE chickens lay eggs. But for every female that exists there is a male. Even if we support egg production where the chickens are treated in the best possible ways, we still support the production of "useless" males. These males are almost always killed (usually as chicks).

2) We need to change our whole mindset about animals. Animals are sentient beings. There really is no rational justification for USING animals in any way. We have to work towards completely changing this situation where all nonhuman animals are basically slaves for humans. Animals exist for themselves not for us humans.

3) I think we should never eat animal products (even if we find them in the rubbish for example, as some "freegans" do), because we need to be living examples of veganism. we need to show how it is possible, and how a completely vegan diet can be really fulfilling and enjoyable (not an ascetic lifestyle where we feel that we are "abstaining" and that we always "can't have" the best foods, and most importantly we have to show that a vegan diet can be healthy and nutritionally 100% adequate for humans of all ages and all lifestyles (of course with a added vitamin B12 supplement or B12 fortified foods). We still have to prove to everyone that a vegan diet works.

OK, I hope that wasn't too long haha
all the best
christian

Posted May 8th, 2011 - 11:03 pm from Berkeley, United States
This member profile has been deactivated

Posted May 8th, 2011 - 11:40 pm by from Sydney, Australia (Permalink)
Oi Machado!!!!!! :o)

Thumbs up for Christian and Zoe.

That's something I wondered a lot in the beginning, if I would eat dairy and eggs if I raised my own animals and had conviction of the way they were treated. I wondered even more after reading "Eating animals" because the author said he'd probably think differently if the animals were treated better / or if there wasn't any factory farms.

But no... I wouldn't. Besides all the compassion and healthy side of it, it's just GROSS!!

But it's your choice, we all have our own reasons why we eat this way!!

Beijosssss
Julia

Posted May 9th, 2011 - 3:46 am by from Paris, France (Permalink)
Hello!

If you eat eggs, you're a vegetarian, not a vegan.
To answer, I would say like you, 3-4 a week.
"Does the fact that we don't eat meat / fish / dairy (and thus any animal fat but the egg yolk), give us the chance to eat more then the recommendable 3 or 4 eggs per week a meat eater should eat?" NO. Because of cholesterol. I guess you can have one egg a day if you want, it also depends on your body.

Personnally I stopped eggs a long time ago, but I would probably eat eggs from my own chickens if I had some.

You can easily replace eggs, especially on pancakes, crepes, cakes, etc...

Posted May 9th, 2011 - 9:30 am by from Cambridge, United States (Permalink)
Hi Machado,

Please be aware that the main disagreement is of words.

A *vegan* person shall eat zero eggs. This is a philosophical/ethical statement.

A ovo-vegetarian eats eggs. How many per week is a health question I will leave to others.

While we vegans would prefer you stay vegan, it's your choice whether you will eat the eggs or not. We just ask that if you eat the eggs, you do not call yourself a vegan. Thanks.

--Anand

Posted May 9th, 2011 - 10:30 am by from Seixal, Portugal (Permalink)
Hi Machado,

Great that you turned Vegan, so what about the eggs?
Just kidding...
But serious, eggs are off-limits for many vegetarians already.. the others made it clear it seems.

If you want to meet other non-egg vegetarians, you can visit the Brahma Kumaris in Lisbon, main centre in Ajuda, sub-centre in St. Apolonia, near your house. Great folks and great food...

Regards,
Wim

Posted May 9th, 2011 - 3:36 pm by from Linden, Germany (Permalink)
btw WELL DONE for being almost vegan ;) I hope you don't have the feeling that everyone is criticising you ;)

I actually don't care TOO much about the words, but about all the non-humans suffering. and bc of that I very much care about veganism =)
Take care
christian

Posted May 9th, 2011 - 4:13 pm by from Paris, France (Permalink)
And if you can't or just don't want to stop eggs (which is quite understandable, "oeufs à la coque" are amazing), try to buy organic ones, or even better, directly in a farm you know, so you can have a look.

Posted May 10th, 2011 - 12:10 am by from Linden, Germany (Permalink)
@VG7 ...and never buy into the illusion that treating other sentient beings as slaves can ever be morally acceptable ;)

Posted May 11th, 2011 - 10:09 am by from Oxford, England (Permalink)
Hi Christian and everyone else
This discussion is really useful to me as I have been thinking about whether I would eat eggs if I say went to live in an eco or veggie community. I am currently vegan as I see no other way to avoid cruelty or torture of animals in the UK in the way food is produced.

1) I would not eat eggs if it meant male chicks had to be killed. But I can imagine in a rural area with a lot of space that this would not be necessary.

2) I agree that all animals are sentient but I am not sure about defining animals as slaves. I am not a slave but I have to work for others to earn money. The distinction between slavery and labour is blurred at the edges I think. For hens which are free to roam but housed where eggs are taken, or 'stolen' I guess, what are the reasons why this is slavery rather cooperation with other animals?

3) I think what you say about showing that a vegan diet can be 100% healthy is very important and persuasive. When I explain to friends that I am healthier than ever being a vegan the subject of suppliments and B12 does come up and people see it as an unnatural diet. Most vegan diets also include packaging, fertisliser, pesticide etc and all of these things are not just 'unnatural' but also harming animals and the environment. Not just food of course but other products as well.

I guess I am unsure whether to say a vegan diet is possible with suppliments and therefore a great choice to make, or say I see nothing wrong with eating eggs but within my current context this unfortunately means necessary suffering and killing and slavery. I find thinking about these things quite complex!

Rich

Posted May 11th, 2011 - 10:54 am from Bonn, Germany
This member profile has been deactivated

Posted May 16th, 2011 - 6:35 pm by from Melbourne, Australia (Permalink)
Another thing is that the original chicken race is extinct; the chickens that we know are like milk cows; really unnatural beings that would die in a matter of weeks without the help of humans.

Chickens lay about 300 eggs per year (even without males around). They used to lay just 10 per year. You can imagine this requires quite a lot of minerals and protein, which I don't think nature provides on its own.

Secondly, like humans, chickens need a safe, private place to lay their eggs; even a biological farm is not private enough for them. Especially if there are no males kept around to protect them. Like all birds and mammals they will feel very stressed out from the constant threat of someone in the neighborhood, who as far as they know will eat their children for sure. After all, in nature the only way for eggs and chicks to survive is to keep them away from other animals at all times.

Personally I don't understand vegetarians that say they care for animal well-being while eating eggs and milk, which are not necessary and easily replaceable. There is just no way that you can keep chickens and cows in a humane way for an affordable price. Male chicks and calves will have to be killed.

Here is how biological chicks get treated:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6i2zg-dkOs

In newer, bigger hatcheries, sex selection is also done with machines; no humans involved.

Posted May 16th, 2011 - 7:25 pm by from Paris, France (Permalink)
"the original chicken race is extinct"
WRONG. I've seen wild chicken in Nepal (Chitwan National Park).

Posted May 16th, 2011 - 8:30 pm by from Melbourne, Australia (Permalink)
That's another race, I believe. Not sure whether people will like eggs that taste natural ;)

Posted May 26th, 2011 - 6:17 pm by from Albufeira, Portugal (Permalink)
Hey guys!

Doing good?

I'm pretty glad to see I caught your attention with this post.
Though I've got to admit I was not expecting (most of) these answers, as some of them denote some lack of love and understanding.
And I don't think harsh and judgmental words will convince anyone to become vegan.

As I describe in my group settings:
"I generally follow a "half way" Vegan / Vegetarian diet (as eggs are the only animal product I use to consume), for health and environmental reasons. Although I do bend the rules, like once a week, with either (a tiny bit) of fish or chicken."

Meaning I'm more concerned about health and environment then ethics.
But still considering becoming "100% vegan" over time, as I increase my knowledge in vegan diets.

And funnily, although the question I asked (what's the maximum amount of eggs we shall eat per week?) could have been answered by vegetarians, only vegans (apparently) replied.

Anyway dear brothers and sisters, much appreciated the time you dedicated to give your opinions.

Love and light.

Machado


Posted May 26th, 2011 - 11:43 pm by from Cambridge, United States (Permalink)
Hi Machado,

I'm sorry some of the words were harsh and judgmental. I think you hit a nerve, especially among vegans.

It is great that you strive to eat a healthy diet and are conscious of the environmental impact. For your specific question of how many eggs to eat in a week, there really isn't an answer. Taking one food out of the context of your complete diet does not work. Whether you eat 3 a week or 7 a week by itself is not going to significantly alter your health. And nobody can tell you one is okay but the other is not.

Finally, the nerve you hit was largely based on terminology. Most vegans would probably say there is no such thing as a "half way vegan". We spend a lot of effort following the vegan principle and lifestyle (not just diet), and it really is close to a 100% effort. And it becomes part of what defines us, like how many people identify themselves with a religion.

If you had used the term "vegetarian" in your original post instead of vegan, the entire thread would have proceeded differently. The vegans would have just moved on, and the ovo-vegetarians would have responded. Using the term vegan caught our attention, and then the phrase "eggs a Vegan person shall eat" caused some to flip out.

Stick to the term vegetarian (except when you're eating chicken, then skip the labels entirely), and you won't face a lack of love and understanding. :-)

--Anand

Posted May 28th, 2011 - 11:13 am by from Southampton, England (Permalink)
Anand, but no one should have to "face a lack of love" simply because their ways don't quite measure up to someone else's ways. this process takes time. people are less likely to want to change if they find other people are all too happy to slap them down. you get more bees with honey than with vinegar, after all. making a mistake should not be grounds for an open waffle stomp on anyone.

just saying.......


best,
Melissa

Posted May 28th, 2011 - 10:58 am by from Southampton, England (Permalink)
hi there :)

personally speaking, I don't tend to eat eggs on a weekly basis. when/if I eat them, I have to kind of be in the mood for them specifically. for example, whenever I get the craving for beans on toast with veggie sausage, I like to have an egg with that. but if I'm honest, eating that meal is very hard on my poor little stomach these days, so I don't tend to make it very often at all. I believe if you are owned by some lovely chickens who have all the freedom to roam your yard as much as they want, eat a good varied non-GMO diet and have fresh water to drink and are not tainted by antibiotics and other nasties, why shouldn't you enjoy their eggs? alright, it's an animal product, but no one died to provide you with it. an egg is only a potential life IF a rooster happens to be in the picture. no rooster = no potential life.

now eating fish or poultry, those are lives which ended. but becoming a full time veggie is not an easy or overnight process. what I would suggest to those who still consume flesh, if you want to make the full transition eventually, why not have a try of some alternatives? also, there are many very good recipes out there in which you can make very decent alternatives of your own, including seafood. did anyone watch 90210 when Naomi and her friends went to the health spa with the phony guru? the feast provided in Naomi's honor features soy shrimp. apparently they all said it was very much like the real deal. I wouldn't know. even when I ate meat, seafood and fish (except tuna) were NOT on the menu for me, yukkkkkkk!!!! just never cared for it.

it can be done. it takes some doing. it's not only a physical process, it's also a psychological process, because you are undoing the conditioned behaviour of a lifetime. that's VERY HARD to get past. especially when you have adverts on tv that constantly push it down your throat how good this or that is for you. so be kind to yourselves, who are struggling, and maybe once a week, try something new!

all the best,
Melissa

Posted May 11th, 2011 - 11:41 am by from Oxford, England (Permalink)
Hi Christian and everyone else
This discussion is really useful to me as I have been thinking about whether I would eat eggs if I say went to live in an eco or veggie community. I am currently vegan as I see no other way to avoid cruelty or torture of animals in the UK in the way food is produced.

1) I would not eat eggs if it meant male chicks had to be killed. But I can imagine in a rural area with a lot of space that this would not be necessary.

2) I agree that all animals are sentient but I am not sure about defining animals as slaves. I am not a slave but I have to work for others to earn money. The distinction between slavery and labour is blurred at the edges I think. For hens which are free to roam but housed where eggs are taken, or 'stolen' I guess, what are the reasons why this is slavery rather cooperation with other animals?

3) I think what you say about showing that a vegan diet can be 100% healthy is very important and persuasive. When I explain to friends that I am healthier than ever being a vegan the subject of suppliments and B12 does come up and people see it as an unnatural diet. Most vegan diets also include packaging, fertisliser, pesticide etc and all of these things are not just 'unnatural' but also harming animals and the environment. Not just food of course but other products as well.

I guess I am unsure whether to say a vegan diet is possible with suppliments and therefore a great choice to make, or say I see nothing wrong with eating eggs but within my current context this unfortunately means necessary suffering and killing and slavery. I find thinking about these things quite complex!

Rich

Posted May 16th, 2011 - 1:33 pm from Ballina, Australia
This member has chosen to allow only Couchsurfing members to see their group posts. To see this full converstion, sign up or log in.

Posted May 28th, 2011 - 11:04 am by from Southampton, England (Permalink)
hi Rich, you can totally have a healthy vegan diet without having to resort to taking supplements. all this requires is some research into it on your part. if you eat all the right things, there will be no need for supplements, including B12, which you really don't need an abundance of. this is yet another way for the system to take advantage of you - promote taking supplements for absolutely everything under the sun. why would they tell you to perhaps overdose on what you're already getting enough of in your diet? MONEY. don't bow down to the golden calf, my friend :)

best,
Melissa

p.s. on the situation of stealing eggs from hens - try to look at it this way - no rooster = no life. if the eggs remain with the hens, they will eventually go off and cause environmental issues. you're not doing a bad thing here. however, if you feel this is an issue you're not comfortable with in your life, then I think you should definitely follow your bliss :)

Posted May 16th, 2011 - 6:42 pm by from Santiago, Chile (Permalink)
I think that pretty much all has been said.

I just wanted to add that in the long run and for EVERYONE, this is not a viable alternative, at some point, your hens will stop laying eggs, are you willing to look after them for the rest of their days?
Then they will die... and where are you going to get another young hen? a breeder?
I have heard of activists that have rescued hens, but I just find it indecent, that saving them from a life of imprisonment and exploitation means they will now have to lay eggs for their rescuers... is like going from a bad slave owner to a very kind one. It's just not right.

I think we need to be living proof that veganism is possible, even if you live in the middle of the countryside nowhere or in the studio apartment in a big city. EVERYONE can be vegan!

Posted May 31st, 2011 - 1:24 pm by from Mullumbimby, Australia (Permalink)
Hey Man,

I heard a guideline .. I think in the book The Omnivore's Dilemma .. 2 per week for battery or two per day if free range happy chookies.

All the best with it!!

Posted May 31st, 2011 - 9:32 pm by from Oxford, England (Permalink)
Hi Everyone
I just got all the replies to my post so thank you very much! I guess my questions are not only trying to figure out how I live/eat now, but why, and also trying to understand other peoples perspectives in different contexts.

Frank - Completely agree that the way things are now eggs and milk cannot be produced economically and respect animals. The price if no chickens or cows were killed would be incredibly high. I guess I was thinking about rescue hens (without thought of price). I also find it hard to imagine a world that respected animal rights! For me I think this would include a world without large scale agriculture, so most vegan diets would also have to change I think.

Michael - When I said HOUSE chickens I did not want to be their Master or control them, or cage them. But maybe this is naive of me. I thought of it as cooperation, or as I said more like 'stealing'. Maybe I should have said 'gathering' from wild birds :). I don't necessarily need to live in the UK, but the world changes and we have many species in the UK that were recently brought over that thrive. Like the rabbit :), there is no going back!

Melissa
There are lots of conflicting stories about B12. I'm not a scientist or doctor, and the UK vegan society recommends a supplement, or at least sell one. It's not just research that is necessary, I feel as I have done quite a lot. It's also who you believe. The first few vegan cook books I read I thought OK, I'll learn to make these meals. Then I looked at the ingredients again and they recommended to me I eat some form of soya everyday in a meal. Others say soya is terrible for you, or some kinds at least. So I eat a bit, but not everyday. For me this is the same as the B12 science, it does not mean I become more certain the more I read :). I try not to bow down to the golden calf, but obviously I don't always make it as I'm typing on a mac :).

Jazmín - If I rescued a hen then I would not kill it if it stopped laying eggs, nor would I imprison it. Both I would see as cruel. I would hope it could live out its days until it died naturally. I know a lot of people rescue dogs as well with no expectation of eggs :).

But you all make a good argument, and you have all pretty much convinced me :).

Maybe I could not eat eggs now anyway, my stomach probably could not cope now!

Posted April 16th, 2012 - 12:21 pm by from Bridgeport, United States (Permalink)
Hi Rich,

I've been a veggie for the last half of my life, and I've tried the gamut of vegetarianism/veganism. I've had time to figure out my own reasons for being a vegetarian. Humans have the ability to make a choice, and thus should make the ethical choice not to eat meat voluntarily, but the meat of the issue is environmental:

Consider that we are on the precipice of a mass extinction. Entire species are disappearing forever while we worry about individual members of a well numbered species. Thus the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few. The Earth can only support so many organisms, but if having a few chickens on otherwise unproductive/unused land saves you a greenhouse gas emitting trip to the grocery, then you might benefit yourself and the overall ecosystem by eating those eggs. I'd more highly recommend growing food as well for this very reason (my dream is a big garden, a few chickens and a goat, personally!).

Just avoid anthropocentrism in your life.

As to how many you can eat: you're certainly offsetting your cholesterol intake by not eating meat. I would eat eggs as you please. Do some research, but keep in mind that cholesterol is as necessary in your diet as anything else (your brain is made of the stuff!). I probably eat the 3-4 myself on average, but long term and short term health really comes down to exercise, not diet, anyway.